Balance

Moderator: GreenLake

Balance

Postby GreenLake » Thu Aug 02, 2012 4:16 pm

Ideal conditions last night. Full moon, clear sky, warm night and a steady breeze.

I set the sails, hooked my bungee to the tiller, and for the next hour had to touch neither one. The boat was perfectly balanced on a close reach and even seemed to luff up in the gusts and fall off in the lulls all by itself.

Magical.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Postby K.C. Walker » Thu Aug 02, 2012 5:02 pm

Perfect!

I raced on a sunfish last night. We had a light breeze and a strong current in the harbor. It sure did make me appreciate my DaySailer all the more.
KC Walker, DS 1 #7002
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Postby GreenLake » Thu Aug 02, 2012 10:34 pm

No comparison. Race nights are quicker on a V15, but whenever the wind kicks up into the upper registers or is gusty (or too low to allow sitting on the side of the boat) I'd rather have the DS around. With practice, I might adjust a bit more to the different style of sailing - but those other boats require much more "technique", it seems and not having to bring that to the table each time makes the DS so much more relaxing.

One of my favorite activities is "ghosting" in nearly non-existing breezes under a starry or moonlit night, with no pressure to arrive anywhere at any specific time. Try that on any of the "tippy" dinghies.
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Postby K.C. Walker » Fri Aug 03, 2012 8:47 am

I also enjoy ghosting. Though, I've never tried it by starlight. Maybe I should get some lights. The UPS sail has added a new element to ghosting that has been enjoyable. I've been getting out for early before breakfast sailing. It's so nice to be on the lake with no other boats and perfectly smooth water.
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Postby GreenLake » Fri Aug 03, 2012 11:29 am

Because the DS is under 7m, you really aren't required to mount any lights under the navigation rules (unless you are motoring). If you do, there are convenient sets of navigation lights that are sold for Kayakers. Get the LED version and find a way to mount them at the bow and stern. That's what I do.

You might need a strong flashlight if you have to pick your way through rocks, pilings, unlit docks or moorings...

Night sailing has it's own attractions, although it makes some people nervous. Beating against current into a rising wind as night falls is probably not the best starting point. Moderate winds, a good full moon, and the lights from a well-populated lake shore can ease the transition.

A UPS might have made a nice difference on my return leg, because it was nearly all close reach. On the way out, it was more like a broad reach turning into downwind as the evening progressed, and I flew a regular spinnaker. I find that in moderate winds, singlehanding a spinnaker isn't rocket science, even had a hand free to take some pictures.
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Re:

Postby EmilioPatrick » Sat Sep 07, 2013 4:18 am

GreenLake wrote:Because the DS is under 7m, you really aren't required to mount any lights under the navigation rules (unless you are motoring). If you do, there are convenient sets of navigation lights that are sold for Kayakers. Get the led light version and find a way to mount them at the bow and stern. That's what I do.

You might need a strong flashlight if you have to pick your way through rocks, pilings, unlit docks or moorings...

Night sailing has it's own attractions, although it makes some people nervous. Beating against current into a rising wind as night falls is probably not the best starting point. Moderate winds, a good full moon, and the lights from a well-populated lake shore can ease the transition.

A UPS might have made a nice difference on my return leg, because it was nearly all close reach. On the way out, it was more like a broad reach turning into downwind as the evening progressed, and I flew a regular spinnaker. I find that in moderate winds, singlehanding a spinnaker isn't rocket science, even had a hand free to take some pictures.


hello friend sorry for old thread reply but can you tell right source to get navigation lights at affordable prices?Waiting for reply thanks in advance:)
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Re: Balance

Postby jeadstx » Mon Sep 09, 2013 12:26 pm

I just carry some small waterproof lights I found at Home Depot that I have to use if I end up out after dark. As I recall, my boat isn't required to have running lights due to it's size. I've heard that some places you can shine a light on the sail for night time sailing.

John
1976 Daysailer II, sail #8075 - Completed the 2011, 2012, and 2013 Texas 200
1952 Beetle Boat Swan Catboat
Early Rhodes 19
1973 Mariner 2+2, sail #2607 - Completed 2014 Texas 200
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Re: Balance

Postby ChrisB » Mon Sep 09, 2013 12:42 pm

I found these on Amazon. Battery powered LED running lights for Kayaks. They aren't exactly what I'd call affordable but if you plan to operate under engine power at night, the single white flashlight isn't an option. These lights solve the problem of adding a battery and hardwiring lights.

http://www.amazon.com/Tektite-Navlite%C ... ing+lights
http://www.amazon.com/Top-ratings-pro-p ... ing+lights
Chris B.
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Re: Balance

Postby GreenLake » Mon Sep 09, 2013 2:07 pm

I uses these navigation lights. They come in an LED and a regular flashlight bulb version. I chose the LED so that I wouldn't need to worry about running out of batteries and they've been good for several seasons of occasional use - usually one night sail and a few times getting back at dusk. (It goes without saying that I still carry a spare set of batteries anyway). I made a bracket to be able to clip them to the bow.
877876
If you go into my gallery you can see the notes for the pictures with additional details.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Balance

Postby talbot » Wed Sep 18, 2013 1:34 am

I agree that the removable running lights (AquaSignal is the brand I used) are a cost-effective solution to reducing the chance that you will get hit by someone. (The fact that you are not required to carry running lights is irrelevant.)

That said, I wearied of having to go forward and attach my running lights, particularly on breezy nights. Like others on the forum, I worked out quick-attach methods, but it was still a drag.

I had already installed a keelson-mounted battery for my auxiliary trolling motor, so last winter, I ran a new circuit and installed fixed Atwood 2-mile LED running lights, just like a regular yacht. I know, it's ridiculous for a dinghy, but we love to sail on the evening breeze, especially on the full moon, and the whole experience is enhanced by being able to just flick a switch at sundown.

You could buy a new jib for the price of the lights, not to mention the time spent groveling around in the cabin trying to heat-shrink butt-splice connectors. So I'm not recommending it. But if you want to . . .

The logical place to mount the lights, with the shortest wire run (voltage loss) and clearest view for oncoming vessels, is on the cabin sides forward of the mast. You could also put them on the bow, but they would be lower, and the DS forepeak is a notoriously wet, clammy place that I could imagine eating up electrical connectors. The problem with the cabin sides is that they are not parallel, so you have to shim the lights to get the legal alignment. I bought a brick of HDPE from Amazon and cut my own shims. Another issue that I never anticipated is that the lights reflect off the deck. That lets you know they are on, which can be a problem with bow-mounted lights. However, the reflected light is bad for your night vision. I'm open to suggestions.

And the stern light? That's still the old AquaSignal removable 360-degree light, powered by its own AA batteries. I put opaque tape on the forward half of the light to keep the cockpit dark and preserve night vision.

With all this, you still should carry a light to shine on your sail. I don't know if that will keep a drunken power boater from running over you, but it might help your kids' lawyer collect in court after the fact.
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Re: Balance

Postby GreenLake » Wed Sep 18, 2013 4:02 am

If you are paranoid, get one of the pistol grip "searchlight" lights to light up your sail. Nobody will have night vision after that, but they won't overlook you. Perhaps only if you see someone approach at full throttle... (and not pointing it at them).

I don't have a fixed battery, and very often sail without, esp for after hours beer can races when I expect the breeze to hold up. With an LED I can (in principle) mount and turn on the lights when leaving the dock (in late afternoon) and still be sure to have battery power when it gets dark enough to see them.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Balance

Postby jeadstx » Wed Sep 18, 2013 12:17 pm

I haven't sailed at night much and therefore haven't used my "attach when needed" lights. I like Talbot's idea of putting lights on the cuddy cabin forward of the mast. Small LED's could probably run off of a small battery, somrthing like a 9V battery. The stern light I carry is a small solar rechargable light like you might use in your yard. The light is bright enough to be seen and lasts about 12 hours. I carry a flashlight for the sail if needed. Although I don't know if a powerboat would miss hitting you at night, they don't seem to see sailboats in daylight hours either.

John
1976 Daysailer II, sail #8075 - Completed the 2011, 2012, and 2013 Texas 200
1952 Beetle Boat Swan Catboat
Early Rhodes 19
1973 Mariner 2+2, sail #2607 - Completed 2014 Texas 200
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